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Shadow
12-18-2007, 09:56 AM
I saw something about this on someone else's blog a while back, but I'm still curious. Why does music not have a rating system? Sometimes they have an advisory, but that's it.

Meanwhile, games do have a ratings system. Yet there is constantly some state, US senator, or some other government body trying to regulate games in one way or another.

This seems backwards. You would think the government would do something about the form of entertainment that doesn't have a ratings system.

Is this only a US quirk or are other countries like this too?

Kruztee
12-19-2007, 12:39 AM
That's because video games are antisocial, evil and idle pursuits (usually reserved for worshippers of the devil) and tend to promote homocidal tendancies in a vast majority of cases. Seriously Shadow, have you been living under a rock for the last few decades?:p

Well anyways, Australia has an advisory sytem for music much the same as the USA with our video games being rated and restricted for sale depending on content. In reality any 13 year old kid can walk into any computer games store in just about any mall in Austalia and buy whatever he/she wants to though. No proof of age would be sought as in the case of say, purchasing alchohol. Games can also be refused classification, which renders them effectively banned from sale domestically. Soldier of Fortune 3 is the latest example of this happening and a censored version is in the pipeline. (By all reports it's a rubbish game in any case.) I've never heard of an album by any musical performer being unavailable for sale in this country, although I'll admit to being rather uninformed in this area. I know that my brother owned copies of all the NWA and Death Row stuff in the 90's, and that was some pretty explicit ummmm...freedom of expression.

Delve
12-19-2007, 01:05 AM
Yeah, but everyone grew up with music. Therefore it's acceptable by definition. It's only these newfangled computy games these kids are holed up in dark rooms playing all night long till they die of exhuastion that are the problem. Right? C'mon, toe the generational line here people!

Kruztee
12-19-2007, 02:06 AM
Yeah, but everyone grew up with music. Therefore it's acceptable by definition. It's only these newfangled computy games these kids are holed up in dark rooms playing all night long till they die of exhuastion that are the problem. Right? C'mon, toe the generational line here people!

Meh, I'm 38 and grew up playing video games (Atari 2600 anyone?) as did most of my friends. I also play PC games with my 13 year old daughter over LAN (she beats me regularly playing Mayhem Intergalactic (http://www.inventivedingo.com/)) just as often as we play silly mario games on her game cube, so I think the generational shift is upon us.

But I agree with you. Most of the criticism of games and gamers seems to be coming from, quite ironically, people who have never really been exposed to them.

Shadow
12-19-2007, 10:16 AM
I do understand why games get attacked all of the time. It's already happened many times in history: tv, movies, rock and roll, D&D, and now games.

A new form of entertainment comes out and the old generation doesn't understand and thinks its "evil". They make a big deal about it, proceed to try to pass many laws about it, and fail. The younger generations accept it more and more mostly because there are more born each day and the young explore and try out new things more often. The older generation will do this also (except for the more born part) :) it just takes them longer as a group.

Soon enough the younger generation that has accepted the new form of entertainment out numbers the old generation that doesn't and the "evil" entertainment is no longer "evil". It's finally an acceptable form of entertainment. And by the end nothing has changed except public opinion.

Now the only part that bothers me is that a bunch of people in government don't realize this and feel really foolish about the laws they try to pass. Oh, wait except they care more about public opinion than they do about doing what is good for the country.